Tag Archives: film

Haunted Houses – 57 Jabotinsky Street – Chapter 1 – The Deserted

The old “Rama” cinema theatre was designed by the German-Polish engineer Leopold Lustig, with influence of the great Art-Deco buildings of the thirties. The structure was completed with the aid of engineer Israel Michaeli in 1938, and was the pride of the Jewish settlement. The impressive structure sits on 1,178 square meters, and in its glory days thousand spectators sat inside the main hall and gallery. “Rama” theatre flourished in the years preceding the Israeli declaration of independence, and was a drawing center to the entire population of Jewish people and Muslims that lived in the area.

In the 80th the competition between the cinemas was hard and a theatre with only one great hall playing just one movie at a time couldn’t bring enough audience to cover all the expanses.  1982 was the year when the “Rama” theatre was terminally closed. From that moment the deserted theatre began to rot, and in 1992 a part of the ceiling fell and made a lot of internal damage. On the other hand, this rotting process gave the place a life of its own. Straying cats, doves and bats made this place their new home. Also people came from time to time and enjoyed the special atmosphere of the place, and some of them even left their artistic mark behind.

During the long years that the “Rama” theatre sat lonely and deserted, it has changed many hands, and also collected a huge property tax debt to the city. In a very controversial decision the city decided to cut the debt in more than 70%, so it could be sold to a new owner who will be able to revive it. Even though this place is considered to be “historic” and should be treated as such, the new owner decided to build a tower residential building of 23 floors, preserving only the front wall of the old Art-Deco Theater. In November 2011 the bulldozers arrived and started the process of destroying the old structure, and making it a new residential monster.

(The vision and the destruction)

During the following months I’ll keep documenting the new “Rama” project, and bring further updates.

Jabotinsky 27 on XNET.

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Beit Dagan Abandoned Military Facility

Beit-Dagan military facility was in use by the army for more then 40 years. It was a factory manufacturing army vehicles, until it was evacuated in 2001. An environmental report from 2009 states that the soil in this place is loaded with poisonous waste, that pollutes the underground natural water reservoir.

 More Haunted Houses are waiting for you here…

Hebrew version of this article on Xnet


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Hasselblad 500C/M

It was a very exciting moment when Yael showed me her Medium format camera – The magnificent Hasselblad 500C/M. She bought it about ten years ago because her teacher at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem told his Photography students they must own a Medium format camera. It was a great expanse for a student, and it took her many years to appreciate it as an asset. Nowadays, though rarely used, Yael’s Hasselblad has a place of honor in her closet, and every now and then, when the muse is right, she takes it for a walk & shot. I was honored to borrow it from her, and immediately thought of ways I can make the best of the two weeks we are going to spend together.

So what is a Medium format??? Apparently the size of the recorded image has several standard measurements, both in Analog and Digital photography. The most common is the 24 by 36mm, film canned in the 135 film canisters, also called 35mm or Full Frame. The Medium format, which is usually 6×6 cm, comes in the 120 film roll (12 frames) or 220 film roll (24 frames). And then we’ve got the founding fathers, the large format with film as big as 4 X 5 inches (102x127mm). For me it was the first chance to play with the big guy’s toys, and I felt like going from earth to outer space. Well, the Hasselblad was the camera chosen by NASA for the landing on the moon…

There are many medium format cameras, but the Swedish Hasselblad considered being one of the best in the market. Using Carl Zeiss Lenses, it is a powerful tool with very sharp results. Medium format cameras are usually used by professionals for fashion and commercial. The high resolution enables enlarging parts of the picture and having outstanding sharpness.

Though the 500C/M is “small” for a Medium format Hasselblad (V-System series), it’s still a heavy and very large tool for street photography. The use of the high mirrored Focusing screen, even if large and bright to watch, takes a lot of experience to get hold of – what you see inside the screen is a mirrored reflection of the view, so the landscape is reversed.

Yom-Kippur arrived and it was a chance to make a grand use of the Hasselblad. I loaded it with Kodak ISO 100 120 film, and placed it in my video Lowepro backpack. Yom-Kippur in Israel is a very interesting occasion. I won’t get into the religious ideas of the tradition, but it’s very similar to the Christian habit of going to confession. The Jewish people punish themselves with one day of fast with no other activities then praying. The country is completely shut down for 24 hours. No cars, no shops, nothing! The non-religious people make this a holiday and opportunity for some quiet time with the family – or better yet, they take the bikes and drive the free-of-cars roads. Some even go open and calls this day – The bicycle holiday! So here I go, in the spirit of the day, riding on my bikes, rolling fast toward Ayalon high-way that leads into Tel-Aviv.

The next week I went with it to Tel-Aviv:

Juli’s restaurant in HaCarmel market:

Hasselblad 500C/M on Facebook

Hasselblad 500C/M on YouTube:


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Miranda Sensorex

Alexander from Jerusalem knew about my crazy bug with film cameras and tried for a long time to raise my interest in his SLR’s collection. A trip to Jerusalem doesn’t take more than one hour drive from Tel-Aviv, but still, I had no big rush to see a Canon or a Nikon. About a week ago he called me and said he has something very special for me. An SLR I just can’t miss. When I asked which SLR he was talking about, he whispered only one word: “Miranda…”. “Miranda who?” I asked. “Check it out” he said, and the conversation was over. I went quickly to the nearest Internet portal – in this case, my Ayo (That’s how Gefen calls my IPhone), and googled “Miranda camera”. Well, of course I was interested – Miranda is a beauty.

Miranda got me thinking all over again about what is it with old cameras we just can’t resist? Is it the mechanic ingenuity that runs by many small metallic parts as a clockwork and snaps light upon chemical papers? Is it the time-lapse that runs through the tool every time we touch it? Or maybe it’s only the end product that we get after 36 clicking or so? I’m sure it’s all of the above and more… You may add your own likeness to this list. When laying my eyes on Miss Miranda I was aware to the fact that beauty is a very important quality, and was immediately drawn to it. I held Miranda in my hands and was amazed how nice it looked. But it was also very heavy in comparison to other cameras I knew (about 988g with the lens). Well people, what can I say? It ain’t heavy… it’s my camera.

And now for some history if you’ll like: Miranda is a Japanese camera manufactured first in 1955 by a long dead company originally called Orion Camera Co.  A lot of thought and ergonomics went into their line of products, but eventually they didn’t last the race and had to close in 1976, leaving behind enough cameras to fill both collectors and users cabinets. The Miranda Sensorex was manufactured between 1966 and 1972 and considered to be a very popular model at the time. It has two unique features that I find to be very interesting. First, if you consider the ergonometric aspect, is the front-mounted shutter release. It will take you some time to get used to it, since we are so used to the shutter release on top of the camera, but once you’ve got it, you’ll ask yourself why it isn’t more popular in the world. The second feature, even more interesting, is the interchangeable prism allowing you to release the viewfinder and look at the prism from above like you’ll do with most medium format cameras. I, for one, am not familiar with this technique. Getting used to it let you take photos from a lower angle. It’s very confusing shifting and rotating the camera in all directions until you get hold of the opposite way in which you have to grasp the view. Nevertheless, having done just that may reward you with something a little bit different.

As always, in order to know a camera, you have to shoot with it. I must admit that lately I’m changing cameras like you’ll change your socks, and with time it’s starting to make me want to stick with just one favorite one. I wanted Miranda to be my companion to take with me for the long yellow brick road of my life. I have 3 lenses for it, ranged from 35mm to 200mm, and it has a very convenient Through-the-lens (TTL) light metering system that makes it easier to shoot. And sure, she is a looker, and you always want to be with a beauty by your side. But the thing that made me go on to the next camera was the weight she carry with her almost Full Metal Jacket of a body. It was like carrying a stone in my bag, rumbling all around inside of it. By the end of the roll I was happy to be done with it and leave it behind when going out. Hell, it was a hard breakup for the both of us. Miranda will find her way, I’m sure of it. Such a beauty doesn’t goes to waste. No doubt she will find her glory behind some glass window drawing dirty looks. Someday I’ll settle down with a camera, and when that day comes, you’ll be the first to be invited to the wedding…  My only hope is that you won’t go whispering behind my back: “You see this guy, he gave up a Miranda. Just look at what he ended up with… The poor bustard…”.

Anyway, here are the results from our short love affair:

The Dome of the Rock overlooking the wailing wall in the old city of Jerusalem

The Wailing Wall

Tel-Aviv beach at sunset – My favorite setting

Ingrid Feldman – a model and a make-up artist. I took a similar photo with the Kiev 4AM.

Chompi the cat

This is Mazen the butcher from Tira.

Miranda Sensorex Page on Facebook

Miranda Sensorex on YouTube:


Haunted Houses – 14 Friedman Street


Many years of neglect, heavy debts to the city and criminals taking over the property helped to transform this big abandoned site to a petri dish saturated with glorious graffiti art, improvised skating structures, field labs for dubious chemical experiments, a habitat for a large community of bats and vandals of all sorts.

The original owner of the property is probably the country real estate fund. In the midst of the 80th the fund leased the place to two privet owned companies that used to rent is to local business, until the end of the 90th. Eventually the buildings were too worn out for use, and the companies, with a huge debt to the city, couldn’t find the money for renovation. With most of the property empty, criminals took over and used the place for their own purposes. Ten years later, and countless of court hearings, the building and warehouse at Friedman 14 are about to collapse, and this huge land that stands just in the middle of a very successful business area is now completely dedicated to the dark lords of the urban derelicts. Compared with the last owners of the property, that didn’t do much to maintain their assets; the place is now a prosperous ghost center that keeps changing all the time.

The series ‘Haunted Houses’ investigate the stories and mysteries of abandoned houses. The name of the city was purposely wiped out – the haunted houses are part their own ghost town. You are welcome to raise your own memories of the house and its surroundings.

Camera and editor: Yaniv Berman

Thanks: Amir Kreizberg & Guy Salach

Music: Roar by Michael Giacchino

 More Haunted Houses are waiting for you…


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Kiev 4AM

Here I’ve got a sad story about the last roll a camera took before dying in my hands…

It wasn’t a love story of any sort, and when I looked at her for the first time she didn’t leave any impression at all. Leonid told me that in those days (early 70th) he used to shot with his Zorki, but when he got a job with the Russian news company he was given a more professional tool – The Kiev camera. It was a crude beast in comparison to the Zorki, but considered by the craftsmen’s of the era to be a working horse. Since then he had a few Kiev cameras, but they all died on him eventually. “It is possible to fix the camera”, he said, “but it is too complicated operation, getting inside this body stuffed with little parts, and fishing for that torn spring. Better to let her rest in peace. Be glad that she gave you this last roll”.

When working with old cameras you should be very careful; any wrong turn of a button could lead to a disaster. I’m not sure what the turning point with this one was, but when unloading the film it suddenly happened, I couldn’t wind it anymore, and it just kept turning to no end. A sad moment indeed, but I didn’t have any real feeling for this one. It was hard work to shot with, it’s heavy and you have to do the focus from above, which is just hell to get used to. I wasn’t sad about her death, just disappointed…

But then I got the roll back from the lab. Of course the film had many flaws – Flashes of light at the sides, dots and scratches. But still, I just loved the photos. At that moment I felt the sting. I’m not sure I’ll go searching for another Kiev, but I sure will miss this one.

The story of the Kiev cameras is an interesting one. After the Second World War Russia raided German factories for machinery and raw materials. A very prestigious establishment was the Zeiss Company and factories in Dresden, manufactures of the Contax cameras. The Russians transferred it all to Kiev and made it their own. They called the camera by the name of the city that accommodates it. So you can say that the Kiev cameras are actually Contax. About 30 years later they still made these cameras (Kiev 4AM) with very similar specifications, but it wasn’t anything like the early ones from the late 40th (Kiev 2) that were totally German by design and parts.

So what actually the Kiev 4AM had to say for itself?

It’s a rangefinder camera with two parallel rangefinder windows that should be kept clear while you hold the camera. It has a Zeiss/Contax bayonet mount. My Kiev 4AM has an Arsenal Helios-103 53mm lens, f/ 1:1.8 with 0.9m to infinity focal range. The Shutter speed on this camera goes from B, 1/2 up to 1/1000. This Kiev 4AM is from 1980 (Indicated by the two first digits in the serial number), but I’m told that later models has reached a shutter speed of 1/1250. But I haven’t said anything about the nicest part of the Kiev, in my opinion anyway, which is the vertical slat shutter that works like a guillotine – Snaps from the top with a nice click that doesn’t bother the camera when it moves. On the down side you’ve got the weight of the camera – which is about 560g…

Two things you have to know before handling this camera: 1. Winding the film by turning the shutter knob clockwise must be done before changing the shutter speed. 2. At the end of the film, when you want to wind it back, you should find the exact point of the right lower ring, so it’s pushing the film release pin inside the camera. It’s not an easy task, because sometimes the inner lever is too worn to do that. At this point, when I thought I could wind the film back, I got this Kiev 4AM killed…

I had my doubts about this camera from the very first moment. It felt heavy and clumsy in my hands. I loaded it with film and went out for a nice travel with two of my friends (Clarisse from Paris and Marta from Rome), that came to Israel for the first time. We had a wonderful day, walking through the beautiful streets of Tel-Aviv and Jaffa, meeting interesting people, eating good food and taking photos every now and then. While Clarisse and Marta were shooting like crazy with their little digital cameras, I was awkwardly carrying the Kiev, slowly focusing, and clicking with a bitter taste of failure in my mouth.

I took some photos on the weekend in Kibbutz Glil-Yam.

Before I was done with the film, I made some photos at the studios where I work on a show.

 This is Leonid Basin, The owner of the Kiev 4AM

Getting the scanned images from the lab made me take the camera out of the drawer of dead cameras I’ve got in the closet (with the dead bodies of a Canon Canonet and my grandfather’s Canon EX EE) for a second look. I played with the dead knob, reloaded the camera with used film, played with it some more, and… Surprise! The camera came back to life! You just can’t imagine my surprise. I called Leonid and told him about it, and he also couldn’t believe, after seeing it dead with his own eyes. I guess this Kiev is meant to last, and maybe the feel of film inside of her chamber made her want more clicking and more touring.

In the following YouTube episode of “My Photographic Time Tunnel” you can see how beautifully it operates:

Kiev 4AM Page on Facebook


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Yashica Lynx 5000E

There’s a lot be said about Yashica cameras and a lot more about the Lynx series in particularly, but the thing that focused my whole attention while shooting, with no regards whatsoever to the camera qualities, is the fact that this camera belongs to my father. He claims to buy it in the early 70’ while he was doing his military service, and used it for at least 15 years before placing it at the back of the closet for his children future use. In those 15 years he went to university, married my mother and had me and my sister. One of my reasons for shooting with a used camera is for its romantic aurora – The things it saw, the memories that went through the lens. My father’s Rangefinder holds a lot of it for me, and I was thrilled to revive it.

Here are a few photos taken back then by my father:

It’s the time of the 1973 war, in the Sinai Desert.

(My father is on the right)

The Lynx series started in 1962 with the 5000 version, which is the predecessor of the Lynx 5000e who sold between 1966 and 1971. With an excellent 45mm Yashinon Lens, this camera is a great rangefinder camera, which used to be a great substitute for an SLR, and sold for a very reasonable price. It has a battery run light meter that helps with the measuring, but in my father’s camera it was long gone and I didn’t bother to find suitable batteries (two 1.3V RM640R). I figured that by now I can rely on my own experience and if I will stuck to daylight and open spaces I will be fine. I think I passed the test…

Operating this camera is pretty basic; all is situated on the lens – ASA, Speed, Aperture (f/1.8 to 22), and of course, the focus. When using the light meter you have to push a Switch button on the front body of the camera, and then search for an “Over” or “Under” lamps flashing inside the viewfinder. If they are absent you can take the shot or replace the batteries… For a very bright light or a shallow depth of field, this 45mm Yashinon lens has a very high shutter speed of 1/ 1000, which was uniquely fast for its time.

As a family camera, I chose to take Yashica when going out on a father and daughter fun day in Tel-Aviv. Gefen is now on her summer vacation, and she wanted to go on a train ride to the big city. I loaded a 200ASA Fuji film, and placed my trust with family ties – Dear Yashica never betrayed us!

Gefen reads the morning paper.

Tel-Aviv train station.

Walking in Rothschild Boulevard. The tents are still there…

A green chair among the tents.

Visiting friends.

Eating a Pizza.

And having a pool party at aunt Anat.

Yahsica Lynx 5000E on YouTube:

Yashica Lynx 5000E Page on Facebook

The Hebrew review on MegaPixel Magazine


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Olympus Pen EE3

A few words should be said about the way I percept analog photography before engaging my review (or rather written experience) on this small and surprising camera.  When I choose to take analog camera to my outdoor exploring, I’m usually considering the camera itself as an inseparable part of the creation. Suddenly the tool is no longer a mere gadget I operate in order to have a photo, but rather some kind of a brush and color I pick for drawing the impressionist image of my active reality. I guess it could be said also on digital, but my feeling is that the digital era brought a lot of sharp and very distinct realism to the documentary moment taken by the lens. When using my digital equipment I feel the urge to achieve the best results from the processor and lens. When living in the analog realm, the expectations from the tools in use (camera, lens and film) are at another dimension. I start looking after the little odd qualities I usually regard as mistakes or defects, and find them more appealing when staining the delicate texture of the celluloid. Again, people may claim that you can Photoshop anything today into the picture, but the analog image, even damaged and totally wacked, is something that you’re usually prefer on leaving alone and let it be as it was intended by the moment. That’s why I like old cameras, and that’s why I search for those cheap and very common cameras, worn by use but still grinding by the clicks!

By the standards I described above, the Olympus Pen EE-3 (The EE Stands for Electronic Eye) is a must-try! It is a real Lomographic camera, and I wish it will be re-discovered and used by all those fast and happy-clicker shooters. The main uniqueness this camera brings with it is the half-frame concept, introduced the first time to the world in 1959 by the Pen series, designed by Maitani Yoshihisa of the Olympus Company in Japan (Mickey from Toronto corrected me about this bit – 35mm half-frame cameras are dated far more early then that. He, for one, own a Half-Frame Ansco Memo from 1927). The concept, scorned by many film lovers, is about using only half size of the common 35mm frame (18x24mm), and by that exploiting the film and producing more photos from the 135 cassette (72 instead of 36). Sure the product you receive has less detail (and tends to be grainy), but by playing with this unique form, you can make a conceptual use of the double frame (or triple), displayed adjusting to one another and sharing two sides of a photographic idea. I’m calling all the Lomographers among you, which regards shooting pictures as a way of exploring the far edges of the duplicated reality, to check this fabulous vintage tool for your purposes and enjoyment.

But using only half of the 35mm frame is not the only thing that makes this camera an unprofessional though semi-artistic brush. The Olympus Pen EE-3, introduced in 1973, is designed by all standards as a Point & Shoot, fully automatic camera, aimed originally to the people who want to push only one button in the process of taking a picture. The name of the brand “Pen” hints that this camera is easy and fast to use, like a pen you pull from your shirt. At first I had my doubts and tried to push and rotate any button or ring installed in this small plastic-metallic box, but soon enough I realized I shouldn’t overdo it. Only one thing is required to do prior to the shooting: The camera enables you to adjust the sensitivity of the film by rotating the ring around the lens to the right position (25 to 400ASA). The light-sensitive electronic-eye around the lens (A selenium meter window, which gives the camera its iconic look and is totally solar – no batteries required for this one!) will adjust to the light and set the aperture automatically at the moment of releasing the shutter, which is set at a fixed speed of 1/200 second. If there is not enough light for shooting at these settings, a red flag will show at the viewfinder, and you’ll be forced to point the camera against a more lighted area.

When shooting indoors you may set the ring to aperture priority, ranging from f/3.5 to 22. At this position the shutter speed will be fixed at 1/40 second. The EE-3 model includes a Flashmatic System which means “automatic flash exposure”. When using a flash connected to the matching strobe, you can set the ring (the only one installed in the camera) instead of ASA or Aperture to Object distance (1 to 4m). The Flashmatic system will do the aperture exposure calculations for you.

The lens equipped in the Pen is a D. Zuiko Wide Angle with a great depth of field, required in a Point & Shoot camera with no focus ring. This way you have all your objects always in focus. I guess most of you SLR lovers find it so very strange, but that’s only one more reason to focus the search of your artistic point of view in other aspects of the use. The lens on this camera is 28mm, which is equivalent to 40mm on a full 35mm frame.

Running amok with the Olympus Pen is fun. Having 72 pictures in stock makes you pay less attention than usual to the quality of your work, but the way I would recommend to do it, is by taking two different point of view pictures of a one idea or story you wants to display. Here is what I achieved with one roll of Fuji 100 ASA, while roaming to the Hezliyya beach and the Tents demonstration in Tel-Aviv, at the almost unbearable heat of August 2011:

Driving to the beach

A viewpoint to the beach

A black flag…

So we sat and played on the sand

Games

Jogging in Tel-Aviv

Collecting the trash of yesterday riots – The tents on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel-Aviv

No pictures please

Interviews all around – The media goes crazy!

Relaxing on the roof. Good night.

Olympus Pen EE3 Page on Facebook

Olympus Pen EE-3 on YouTube:


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Canon AE-1

After 10 years of digital cameras, I felt the urge to go back in time and shot pictures with real film. I can describe in details how much I love the feel of celluloid and raw materials, but I know a lot of you think the same. What I intend to do here is to review a few cameras from the old time, and show you the results I’ve got. I hope it will give you the extra push to search the closet for that old camera you stored back then in the days when it took a few long hours between pushing the button and looking at the final result.

I just finished the first roll of my old/new Canon AE-1. This camera, manufactured between 1976 and 1984 is a great fun and not so difficult to handle. It took me some time to find her a 6V 28-PX battery, which is essential for operating, but once I got it powered up, it was as good as new.

In fact, one of the things that made this camera such a big success in the early 80′ is it’s automatic exposure when using FD Lenses. The rest of the job is been done with a very easy to learn light detector, which indicate which shutter speed is best.

When I were scheduled for a production in Kibbutz Ein-Gedi by the Dead Sea, I took it as an opportunity for some testing. I used FD 50mm 1:1.8 and a FD 75-200mm 1:4.5 lenses, and 200 ASA Kodak film.

Here are the results:

Keren, the dresser, use her IPad with the Judea mountains as backgroung.

Beny, the sound man.

Udi behind the camera.

Dany talks to the camera.

The dead sea is very dense with salt, but nevertheless Dany got a fish by the tail!

And this is me with the fish… No more salt is needed.

Please let me know what you think about the photos…

In conclusion I find this camera surprisingly easy to use and the results are well focused and exposed. The only downside I can find with it, is that the camera requires a 6v battery, which is not so common.

Canon AE-1 Page on Facebook

 


Shooting at The Shrine of the Book

זכיתי בהזדמנות יוצאת דופן לקחת חלק בהפקה של סדרת תלת-מימד (נו, אתם יודעים, הסרטים האלו שרואים עם משקפיים). את הפרק הראשון צילמנו בהיכל הספר שבמוזיאון ישראל. בד”כ אי אפשר לצלם בתוך ההיכל, בו נמצאות חלק מהמגילות הגנוזות, היקרות מפז, אבל במסגרת ההפקה ביליתי זמן רב בהיכל, אחרי שעות הסגירה. התמונות צולמו, כמובן, בלי פלאש, על מנת שלא לפגוע במגילות העתיקות. אתם מוזמנים להנות ממבנה שהוא יצירת אוונגרד, אולי היחידה בארץ, אשר נבנתה בשנות השישים ע”י האדריכלים בארטוס וקיסלר. אני ממליץ בחום לנצל את החופשה על מנת לנסוע למוזיאון ישראל, אשר עובר שיפוץ נרחב ונראה פשוט מדהים! מנהל היכל הספר, ד”ר אדולפו רויטמן, שהסכים להתארח בתוכנית, הוא אדם מרתק, וכדאי לשמוע מפיו את סיפורן של המגילות השזור בצופן ארכיטקטוני יחיד במינו

תמונות מהסט

היכל הספר מבחוץ – יצירת אוונגרד משנות ה-60

מגילת ישעיהו – המגילה שנשתמרה כמעט בשלמותה – כאן בעותק לא מקורי, אבל בתצוגה יוצאת דופן

כיפת ההיכל כפי שהיא נריאת מבפנים – בדומה לראש כד שבו נמצאה המגילה. מתחת לכיפה, ידית המגילה. בארטוס וקיסלר האדריכלים שילבו כאן גם אלמנטים של רחם, פריון, סמלים פאליים ווגינליים – יצירה אוונגרדית, כבר אמרתי

ג’קי מנחה התוכנית עומד לפני מלצלמת התלת-מימד

תמונה קבוצתית של צוות הצילום


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