Tag Archives: canon

April Snow

Rimon School of Jazz & Contemporary Music has a very interesting program with the Israeli nonprofit Mental Health Association (Enosh), where selected talented students take lyrics written by mentally ill patients and transform them into wonderful songs. The program is managed by song writer and performer Ariel Horovitz, and it’s called “Hahani Hahacher” (The other me).

This year they asked me to make a video clip for one of their songs. They’ve selected “Moridat HaShlagim” (The one that bring the snow) written by Lauren Milk, composed and performed by Naama Chetrit.

I had a few ideas for making the video clip; one of them was to involve my street artist friend Imaginery Duck to do some time lapse drawings. After conferring with Naama we decided on a script and launched a small scale production. Shahar Ziv and Almog Sella volunteered to help me in the shooting, while the other participants in the program came to play the extras.

For the scenery I chose a ruined boarding school for girls that I discovered during my “Haunted Houses” project. It has a creepy feeling of sadness and death to it, so we played on that notion with the extras playing as the ghosts of past students.

Even though the production was scheduled for the whole day, we shot it on holiday and had only until noon to film it, before all the participants dissolved. I used a Canon 7D and Almog brought her Canon 5D, which helped to gain more footage from a single performance. Since we had very little time, and no electricity in the near area I used only available light, which could be a problem in a day when the clouds play hide and seek with the sun. A good thing is that Almog has a great L series 50mm f/1.4 lens which helped us in the low light environment.

Shahar, who is a very talented editor, took the materials I gathered and assembeled them for the final result, which you are welcome to watch here:

The photos of the behind the scenes were taken by Imaginery Duck, who roamed the area and did some magnificent drawings on the walls:

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Haunted Houses – “Magen” Factory at Derech HaShalom

“Magen” Factory was built by the Israel Military Industry in Tel-Aviv at 1950. The factory manufactured weapons as the “Uzi” machine gun and the “Galil” rifle, up unit 1996. During that process a lot of chemical waste was buried in the ground. At 1997 the first signs of the terrible neglect has surfaced, when a ground test results has shown that the whole area is heavily contaminated with dangerous metals and chemicals. The ground water was also contaminated and at least 25 wells had to be closed down.

It took another 15 long years for the government to dig out the contaminated soil and transport it to a special chemical waste facility. But now the damage was too great, and 10 kilometer square of underground water was infected. All the development plans for the area had to be postponed until better results would be found.

The only people that enjoy the current status-qua are a few graffiti artists that turned the empty factory into their own art gallery. Brave urban explorers who ventures into the area can now enjoy 4 floors of the finest graffiti art of disturbing images about destruction and human evil.

Camera and editor: Yaniv Berman

Music: Bernard Herrmann

“Magen” Factory on XNet


Haunted Houses – 57 Jabotinsky Street – Chapter 2 – Destruction

After 74 years the Rama Theater, sitting on 57 Jabotinsky Street, is being torn down. In the next months a 22-story high-rise will erupt from under the rubble and only a sad looking wall of shame will remind us of the place it once was. The rain is falling, the walls are crying and the memories are slowly washed down and are seeping into the filthy ground, where the Rama Theater is buried, deep inside the decaying history of a city that wants to forget. May our regrets rest in peace…

Camera and editor: Yaniv Berman

Music: Le Orme

57 Jabotinsky Street – Part 1


Haunted Houses – 57 Jabotinsky Street – Chapter 1 – The Deserted

The old “Rama” cinema theatre was designed by the German-Polish engineer Leopold Lustig, with influence of the great Art-Deco buildings of the thirties. The structure was completed with the aid of engineer Israel Michaeli in 1938, and was the pride of the Jewish settlement. The impressive structure sits on 1,178 square meters, and in its glory days thousand spectators sat inside the main hall and gallery. “Rama” theatre flourished in the years preceding the Israeli declaration of independence, and was a drawing center to the entire population of Jewish people and Muslims that lived in the area.

In the 80th the competition between the cinemas was hard and a theatre with only one great hall playing just one movie at a time couldn’t bring enough audience to cover all the expanses.  1982 was the year when the “Rama” theatre was terminally closed. From that moment the deserted theatre began to rot, and in 1992 a part of the ceiling fell and made a lot of internal damage. On the other hand, this rotting process gave the place a life of its own. Straying cats, doves and bats made this place their new home. Also people came from time to time and enjoyed the special atmosphere of the place, and some of them even left their artistic mark behind.

During the long years that the “Rama” theatre sat lonely and deserted, it has changed many hands, and also collected a huge property tax debt to the city. In a very controversial decision the city decided to cut the debt in more than 70%, so it could be sold to a new owner who will be able to revive it. Even though this place is considered to be “historic” and should be treated as such, the new owner decided to build a tower residential building of 23 floors, preserving only the front wall of the old Art-Deco Theater. In November 2011 the bulldozers arrived and started the process of destroying the old structure, and making it a new residential monster.

(The vision and the destruction)

During the following months I’ll keep documenting the new “Rama” project, and bring further updates.

Jabotinsky 27 on XNET.


My Photographic Time Tunnel – Canon AE-1

After 10 years of digital cameras, I felt the urge to go back in time and shot pictures with real film. I can describe in details how much I love the feel of celluloid and raw materials, but I know a lot of you think the same. What I intend to do here is to review a few cameras from the old time, and show you the results I’ve got. I hope it will give you the extra push to search the closet for that old camera you stored back then in the days when it took a few long hours between pushing the button and looking at the final result.

I just finished the first roll of my old/new Canon AE-1. This camera, manufactured between 1976 and 1984 is a great fun and not so difficult to handle. It took me some time to find her a 6V 28-PX battery, which is essential for operating, but once I got it powered up, it was as good as new.

In fact, one of the things that made this camera such a big success in the early 80′ is it’s automatic exposure when using FD Lenses. The rest of the job is been done with a very easy to learn light detector, which indicate which shutter speed is best.

When I were scheduled for a production in Kibbutz Ein-Gedi by the Dead Sea, I took it as an opportunity for some testing. I used FD 50mm 1:1.8 and a FD 75-200mm 1:4.5 lenses, and 200 ASA Kodak film.

Here are the results:

Keren, the dresser, use her IPad with the Judea mountains as backgroung.

Beny, the sound man.

Udi behind the camera.

Dany talks to the camera.

The dead sea is very dense with salt, but nevertheless Dany got a fish by the tail!

And this is me with the fish… No more salt is needed.

Please let me know what you think about the photos…

In conclusion I find this camera surprisingly easy to use and the results are well focused and exposed. The only downside I can find with it, is that the camera requires a 6v battery, which is not so common.

Canon AE-1 Page on Facebook

 


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